Learning to let your faith guide you…

The Purpose Driven Life by Rick Warren, The Case For God by Karen Armstrong, and Cure for the Common Life by Max Lucado all help readers to delve into the Christian faith. The authors ask the readers to reflect on their lives, thoughts, feelings, and outlook in order to make a relationship with God a more integral part of their daily life. Any of these titles is for those who seek a deeper relationship with God.

Back in the day…


At Home by Bill Bryson and The Year 1000 by Robert Lacey both take the reader on a fun journey through the everyday life of years past. At Home uses the house as a jumping off point to discuss the idiosyncrasies of daily life. Byrson has a hilarious way of informing the reader of even the most mundane feature of history. The Year 1000 uses the calendar as a jumping off point to do the same. If you like fun factoids about how things came to be, such as saying, traditions, inventions, etc. these will certainly tickle your fancy.

How did we get here….


13 Bankers by Simon Johnson and The Big Sort by Bill Bishop complement each other by walking you through the various aspects of how our country has changed and lead us to what many would consider the current day mess we are in. 13 Bankers details the issues with the financial sector and The Big Sort explains how our voting and political aligning have changed. Read both to see how the many changing facets of the American have altered the direction of our nation.

The Great Saga…

New York by Edward Rutherfurd spans many generations living in this iconic city beginning in the 1600’s all the way through present day. Rutherford is an expert at meticulously weaving historical detail with fiction. The reader will see New York transform before his/her eyes with wonderful description. Filled with tradegy, betrayals, romance, and friendship, this book has a little bit of everything to create a sweeping drama.

Personal Stories…

The Last Storyteller by Diane Noble, The Night Journal by Elizabeth Crook and The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton all take you on a hunt. As the main character of each book deals with her own present day situations, she is carefully unraveling mysteries and long forgotten stories of her family’s past all while learning more about life and herself. Set in a variety of locations and time periods, each one has its own particular zest and intrigue.

Racial Tensions….

The Help by Kathryn Stockett and Rainwater by Sandra Brown both illuminate the emotions surrounding racial tensions in the early part of the twentieth century. Although rather different in length and depth (The Help is quite a bit longer, but an engrossing read), they both touch a nerve. Each book has uniquely sketched characters that you truly feel connected to and can empathize with. Once you get to know the characters, let the stories take you completely into the heart of what it must have felt like to live in that era.

Could it have been China…

Gavin Menzies takes the reader on a unique ride through the evidence for the case that the Chinese had many skilled seaman who explored much of the world prior to the conventionally accepted European exploration of the globe. He follows this idea further in his second book where he explains how during some of the Chinese seafaring expeditions they had formed relationships with Europeans and passed along crucial information regarding technological and artistic innovations. These are both fascinating reads for those looking to explore all the nooks and crannies of this time period. Menzies has done a great deal of research for these books and while not everything he claims can be verified 100%, he posits some very plausible and logical scenarios.

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